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28 Jan 2003 : Column 751W—continued

Crime

Mr. Chope: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will define total crime for the purposes of the allocation of drug and crime reduction funding for 2003–04 to police basic command units. [93353]

Mr. Bob Ainsworth [holding answer 27 January 2003]: The national recorded crime statistics for burglary, robbery and theft of and from vehicles, were used for determining the 30 Basic Command Units (BCUs) with the highest levels of acquisitive crime. Although recorded crime statistics do not differentiate between drug and non-drug related crime, these types of crimes are the ones mostly closely associated with drug use.

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Crime Reduction

Ross Cranston: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to his written answer of 16 December 2002, Official Report, column 624W, when he plans to place the findings of the exercise on crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their implications for nuisance and noise associated with fireworks in the Library; and if he will make a statement. [91856]

Mr. Denham: As I indicated to my hon. Friend on 16 December 2002, Official Report, column 624W, the monitoring exercise he refers to was set up to monitor incidents relating to the improper use of fireworks between 23 October and 15 January. We are currently gathering and analysing the responses received. Once this process has been completed a copy of our findings will be placed in the Library.

Criminal Cases Review Commission

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many convictions have been overturned by the Court of Appeal following a referral by the Criminal Cases Review Commission since March 1997. [92309]

Hilary Benn: The Court of Appeal has quashed 60 convictions obtained in England and Wales following references by the Criminal Cases Review Commission.

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cases, where the conviction has been overturned by the Court of Appeal following a referral by the Criminal Cases Review Commission, had previously been investigated by his Department prior to March 1997. [92310]

Hilary Benn: Departmental records indicate that 36 cases, where the Court of Appeal has quashed a conviction obtained in England and Wales following references by the Criminal Cases Review Commission, had previously been the subject of applications to my right hon. Friend the Home Secretary for a referral. I am unable to say how many of these 36 cases were investigated prior to their transfer to the Commission, as this information could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cases the Criminal Cases Review Commission has referred to the Court of Appeal since March 1997. [92311]

Hilary Benn: The Criminal Cases Review Commission has referred 173 cases to the Court of Appeal. (This figure includes referrals of convictions or sentences or both, but excludes referrals to the Court of Appeal in Northern Ireland or to Crown Courts.)

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cases have been referred to the Criminal Cases Review Commission since March 1997. [92312]

Hilary Benn: There have been 5,520 applications from England, Wales and Northern Ireland to the Criminal Cases Review Commission. This figure includes

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requests for case reviews of both summary and indictable convictions and of sentence only. At least three quarters of the applications received prove to be ineligible for a case review (usually because of a failure to exhaust the normal appeals process).

Drink-driving

Mark Tami: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many custodial sentences

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were given for drink-driving offences in the last three years, broken down by police authority; [91567]

Hilary Benn: Information taken from the Home Office Court Proceedings Database on convictions and custodial sentences for drink-driving offences by police force area 1998 to 2000 is shown in the table. Data for 2001 will be available in February.

Findings of guilt and immediate custodial sentences at all courts for offences of driving etc after consuming alcohol or taking drugs by police force area, 1998—2000

1998 1999 2000
Police Force area Findings of guiltImmediate custody(10)Findings of guiltImmediate custody(10)Findings of guiltImmediate custody(10)
Avon and Somerset2,5661572,7281652,462152
Bedfordshire1,060968698779789
Cambridgeshire1,060629414379341
Cheshire1,9031191,8271331,652122
Cleveland870638115777756
Cumbria856518713780650
Derbyshire1,5472021,4631811,417126
Devon and Cornwall2,2651272,2771122,199104
Dorset 1,186 881,120961,11584
Durham1,035 531,137811,12476
Essex2,4382332,5282612,462237
Gloucestershire985368895180437
Gt Manchester 4,7154534,8504644,801428
Hampshire3,597 2313,7252133,472244
Hertfordshire1,672911,679901,55298
Humberside1,358871,323971,371128
Kent2,6271552,6331332,592134
Lancashire2,9451783,0101842,584163
Leicestershire1,4851401,6241881,531152
Lincolnshire979369414481648
London, City of301923651624
Merseyside2,4513262,1372962,128286
Met Police13,8891,05012,41483811,801891
Norfolk1,118431,0106493545
Northamptonshire1,062731,0589178290
Northumbria2,4571942,4632292,621215
North Yorkshire1,205771,124601,07367
Nottinghamshire1,8042471,8022621,722210
South Yorkshire2,0021781,9271492,122170
Staffordshire(11)1,9551401,711143(12)(12)
Suffolk1,042601,0897190274
Surrey1,328581,417471,53961
Sussex2,1131132,2241202,112136
Thames Valley3,896 1953,7252163,496212
Warwickshire784538563878642
West Mercia1,794971,7471141,631101
West Midlands5,5825324,7755324,559451
West Yorkshire 3,6693293,597358 3,375287
Wiltshire1,108391,0094593028
Total England 86,7096,47183,5676,39580,6716,076
Dyfed Powys995389444885845
Gwent1,203841,079781,21199
North Wales1,306951,248941,33292
South Wales2,9032392,5262822,757255
Total Wales6,4074565,7975026,158491
Total England and Wales93,1166,92789,3646,89786,8296,567

(10) Immediate custody includes sentences of Secure Training Order, Detention and Training Order Young Offenders Institution, and Unsuspended sentence of imprisonment.

(11) Staffordshire police force were only able to submit sample data for persons proceeded against and convicted in the magistrates' courts for the year 2000. Although sufficient to estimate higher orders of data, these data are not robust enough at a detailed level and have been excluded from the table.

(12) Not available.


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Drug Dependency (Prisoners)

Mr. Norman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what measures he proposes to improve the quality and coverage of prison-based drug treatment programmes. [92114]

Hilary Benn: A framework is already in place to address the wide-ranging needs of drug-misusing prisoners and includes:


Delivery is supported by a range of quality standards:


Additionally, the Service is working closely with the National Treatment Agency to ensure its models of care, treatment standards and standards for drug workers are, where appropriate, being applied to prison-based work.

The Government's 2002 Spending Review made provision for significant, additional funding for action on drugs misuse. In particular, investment in aftercare and throughcare will help ensure the gains made whilst prisoners are in custody are not lost on their release. Provision has also been made to boost treatment in prisons.

Mr. Norman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he has made of the number of prisoners in the United Kingdom who would benefit from a programme of treatment for drugs dependency. [92118]

Hilary Benn: Records of the number of prisoners who would benefit from a programme of treatment are not kept centrally. Data from the Office for National Statistics show that around 80 per cent. of prisoners had used drugs at some point before coming into prison, with 54 per cent. reporting drug dependency in the year prior to custody.

A framework is in place to address the wide-ranging needs of drug-misusing prisoners and includes:


Delivery is supported by a range of quality standards:


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Additionally, the Service is working closely with the National Treatment Agency to ensure its models of care, treatment standards and standards for drug workers are, where appropriate, being applied to prison-based work.

The Government's 2002 Spending Review made provision for significant, additional funding for action on drugs misuse. In particular, investment in aftercare and throughcare will help ensure the gains made while prisoners are in custody are not lost on their release. Provision has also been made to boost treatment in prisons.

Mr. Norman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the routes by which drugs enter prisons; and what proportion enter through external visits. [92121]

Hilary Benn: By definition drug smuggling is a covert activity which is extremely difficult to quantify and will vary between prisons. The main identified routes by which attempts are made to smuggle drugs into prisons include:





Mr. Norman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many places on drug treatment programmes are available to prisoners in (a) England and (b) Kent. [92101]

Hilary Benn: The Prison Service has in place a comprehensive framework to address the needs of drug-misusing prisoners.

Delivery targets are given in the table.

InterventionAll prisons' targets (by March 2004)Kent targets (2002–03)
CARATs(13)25,0001,000
Detoxification27,000210
Rehabilitation programmes and TCs(14)5,700406
VDT compacts(15)28,0002,234

(13) Counselling assessment referral advice through care.

(14) Therapeutic communities.

(15) Voluntary drug testing.


Mr. Norman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what measures he intends to take to ensure that arrestees who test positive for drugs are directed into treatment programmes. [92112]

Mr. Bob Ainsworth: In the areas in England and Wales where the provisions for drug testing persons in police detention are currently being implemented, it is part of the drug testing procedure that those who test positive for a specified Class A drug are given specific opportunity to see an arrest referral worker, with a view to assessment of their drug misuse and referral to appropriate treatment.

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Measures being introduced as part of the Government's new comprehensive programme of criminal justice interventions to get drug misusers into treatment include the enhancement of existing arrest referral schemes and the expansion and extension of the drug testing arrangements under which the police can test persons, after charge, for specified Class A drugs. We are also taking forward in the Criminal Justice Bill the proposal to pilot a presumption against bail for those who refuse to be assessed as to their dependency on, or propensity to misuse, specified Class A drugs, or who then refuse to undergo relevant follow-up action recommended.

The programme will be backed up by improvements in treatment capacity and local delivery.

Mr. Norman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of prisoners in Kent tested positive for drugs in each of the past five years. [92113]

Hilary Benn: The proportion of prisoners who tested positive under random mandatory drug testing (MDT) in Kent prisons is given in the table.

Percentage positive
1997–9813.6
1998–9911.9
1999–20009.8
2000–018.8
2001–029.4

Mr. Norman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what measures he proposes to address the availability of drugs in prisons. [92120]

Hilary Benn: A range of measures is in place to reduce the availability of drugs in prisons. Elements include:


Mr. Norman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners in the past year underwent treatment for drugs dependency in (a) England and (b) Kent. [92119]

Hilary Benn: The numbers of prisoners engaging in some form of drugs treatment during 2001–02 are given in the table.

InterventionAll prisons (England and Wales) Kent prisons
CARATs(16)39,279 initial assessments1,697
Detoxification40,865 entrants616
Rehabilitation programmes and therapeutic communities4,691 entrants539
Voluntary drug testing compacts27,041 compacts signed2,432

(16) Counselling, Assessment, Referral, Advice and Throughcare services.


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